by StorageReview Enterprise Lab

OCZ Intrepid 3600 SSD Review

The OCZ Intrepid 3600 is an enterprise-class SSD designed specifically for workloads like transaction processing, VM infrastructure, and email servers, while featuring advanced enterprise-grade functionality with a focus on performance, endurance, and reliability. The Intrepid 3000 Series also supports the industry standard 2.5-inch form factor and consists of two configurations: the Intrepid 3600 line, which takes advantage of reliable and cost-effective MLC NAND media, and the Intrepid 3800 line which features high endurance eMLC NAND media. OCZ has also put an emphasis on sustained performance and consistent I/O responses both of these SSDs.

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by Lyle Smith

HGST Extends Agreement With Intel to Produce SAS SSDs

HGST has announced that it will extend the use of Intel NAND flash technology as part of a cooperative agreement with Intel Corporation on Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) SSDs. HGST successfully worked with Intel since 2008 to develop enterprise-class SAS SSDs for servers, workstations, and storage systems, resulting in products that combine HGST’s enterprise storage experience with Intel’s NAND flash expertise.

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by Lyle Smith

Samsung SM1623 Enterprise SSD Released

Samsung has announced that it has begun mass producing the SM1623, a new high-performance SAS SSD using 10-nanometer class MLC NAND flash. The new Samsung SAS SSD is designed to meet the needs of many global customers for cost-effective, high-capacity SSDs and is targeted at enterprise customers. 

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by Brian Beeler

WD SSD Revenues Grow 43% Year over Year

WD reported their fiscal yearly results this week and overall the numbers looked pretty similar to most other quarters/years that get reported in the HDD business. The HDD business is an oligopoly that is impossible to penetrate by a new entrant. Thus, WD and its fully owned HGST division, take their near half of the business, Seagate takes their big share and Toshiba takes what's left over. Where the market is different though is in the enterprise SSD business where WD has invested substantially over the last year. Here, HGST shows significant growth as they hold a strong position in the enterprise SAS SSD segment, driving in over $500 million in revenue in fiscal 2014. 

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by Lyle Smith

HGST Ultrastar SSD1600MR, SSD800MH.B, and SSD1600MM Enterprise SSDs Launched

HGST has announced the next-generation of its Ultrastar 12Gb/s SAS SSDs, with capacities up to 1.6TB. The new Ultrastar SSD800MH.B, Ultrastar SSD1600MM, and Ultrastar SSD1600MR SSDs are designed for server and storage systems running today’s performance-sensitive enterprise applications and are capable of boasting sequential throughput up to 1100MB/s read and 765MB/s write as well as up to 130,000 read and 110,000 write IOPS.

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by Adam Armstrong

Samsung SSD 845DC PRO Review

The Samsung 845DC PRO is an enterprise-grade SSD designed to deliver high performance, especially in random write, and consistent low latency over the life of the SSD. The 845DC PRO has adopted the world’s first 24-layer 3D V-NAND technology for its storage, giving it up to 10 times higher endurance than conventional NAND. The drive has a cache memory up to 1GB, uses a Samsung3-core MDX controller and in-house firmware, SATA 6Gb/s interface, and boasts impressive performance numbers: sequential write up to 460MB/s and sequential read up to 530MB/s.

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by Lyle Smith

Samsung PM853T SSD Review

The Samsung PM853T is the latest entrant into the enterprise SSD space for the company. Like its sister SSD the 845DC EVO (they differ mostly in distribution channel), the PM853T leverages Samsung's TLC NAND and SATA interface. The result is a drive that's a capable alternative for entry-enterprise workloads that tend to be more read centric. The biggest draw however is not so much performance, though the drive excels there, it's drive cost that is the highlight. The PM853T gives the enterprise a solution that is cost effective enough with a performance profile and cost of ownership number that helps spell the end for high-speed 2.5" hard drives. 

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by Lyle Smith

Samsung SM843T SSD Review

The Samsung SM843T is an enterprise-grade SSD that is designed to offer a consistent level of performance (99.9% reliable latency and QoS) over its lifespan, and is ideal for core enterprise use cases including Big Data systems, VDI and other high-performance enterprise platforms. The SM843T is a companion to the Samsung SM843 drive, which was originally reviewed approximately a year ago. Though both Samsung SSDs use the same MDX S4LN021X01-8030 Controller, the new SM843T is architected specifically for mixed data center use cases, while the SM843 is designed to be used in environments that require read-intensive behavior like server boot drives, higher-end enterprise client workstations and certain embedded applications. The other main difference between the two is that the SM843T uses enterprise NAND (eMLC), which focuses on prolonging the reliability of the drive, while the SM843 uses client MLC NAND.

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by Josh Linden

Memblaze PBlaze3H and PBlaze3L Application Accelerator Review

Memblaze offers a dizzying array of configurations for PBlaze3 across 38 different capacities as part Memblaze's Pianokey technology. In addition to the MLC-based drives evaluated for this review, both drives are also available in SLC editions. Pianokey and other core components of the PBlaze3 platform are built with Memblaze's own proprietary technologies which is one reason to keep an eye on their emerging new product lines. One of the advantages that Memblaze argues for its products over comparable drives is that the card provides most of the computational and DRAM requirements for its operation, reducing PBlaze3's operational overhead to the host system.

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by Brian Beeler

If Your Databases Aren't on Flash, You're Doing it Wrong

The title isn't meant to be incendiary, though it may come of as such. It's simply meant to communicate the point that the benefits of flash in the data center are so proven that if you're not taking advantage of flash in some capacity there are two main reasons why. Either one, you're afraid, or two, your data is low value and no one wants to access it. That's about it, the long-standing concerns over price and endurance have been mitigated and for certain applications like databases, flash delivers a better experience with lower cost of ownership. 

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