by Lyle Smith

WD Red Pro Review (4TB, NASware 3.0)

Alongside the launch of the larger 6TB capacity Red HDDs with NASware 3.0, WD also launched a new family of NAS drives dubbed Red Pro. The Red Pro HDDs spin at 7,200RPM, come in capacities of up to 4TB, and are designed for larger tower or rackmount NAS environments in the 8 to 16 bay range. Aside from support for larger environments, the Red Pro line of HDDs differentiates from Red in that the drives are faster, 7K spindle speed, extended thermal burn-in testing, hardware-based vibration compensation and a longer warranty.

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by Lyle Smith

WD Red Pro Review (4TB, NASware 3.0)

Alongside the launch of the larger 6TB capacity Red HDDs with NASware 3.0, WD also launched a new family of NAS drives dubbed Red Pro. The Red Pro HDDs spin at 7,200RPM, come in capacities of up to 4TB, and are designed for larger tower or rackmount NAS environments in the 8 to 16 bay range. Aside from support for larger environments, the Red Pro line of HDDs differentiates from Red in that the drives are faster, 7K spindle speed, extended thermal burn-in testing, hardware-based vibration compensation and a longer warranty.

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by Lyle Smith

Samsung PM853T SSD Review

The Samsung PM853T is the latest entrant into the enterprise SSD space for the company. Like its sister SSD the 845DC EVO (they differ mostly in distribution channel), the PM853T leverages Samsung's TLC NAND and SATA interface. The result is a drive that's a capable alternative for entry-enterprise workloads that tend to be more read centric. The biggest draw however is not so much performance, though the drive excels there, it's drive cost that is the highlight. The PM853T gives the enterprise a solution that is cost effective enough with a performance profile and cost of ownership number that helps spell the end for high-speed 2.5" hard drives. 

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by Lyle Smith

Samsung PM853T SSD Review

The Samsung PM853T is the latest entrant into the enterprise SSD space for the company. Like its sister SSD the 845DC EVO (they differ mostly in distribution channel), the PM853T leverages Samsung's TLC NAND and SATA interface. The result is a drive that's a capable alternative for entry-enterprise workloads that tend to be more read centric. The biggest draw however is not so much performance, though the drive excels there, it's drive cost that is the highlight. The PM853T gives the enterprise a solution that is cost effective enough with a performance profile and cost of ownership number that helps spell the end for high-speed 2.5" hard drives. 

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by Lyle Smith

Samsung SM843T SSD Review

The Samsung SM843T is an enterprise-grade SSD that is designed to offer a consistent level of performance (99.9% reliable latency and QoS) over its lifespan, and is ideal for core enterprise use cases including Big Data systems, VDI and other high-performance enterprise platforms. The SM843T is a companion to the Samsung SM843 drive, which was originally reviewed approximately a year ago. Though both Samsung SSDs use the same MDX S4LN021X01-8030 Controller, the new SM843T is architected specifically for mixed data center use cases, while the SM843 is designed to be used in environments that require read-intensive behavior like server boot drives, higher-end enterprise client workstations and certain embedded applications. The other main difference between the two is that the SM843T uses enterprise NAND (eMLC), which focuses on prolonging the reliability of the drive, while the SM843 uses client MLC NAND.

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by Lyle Smith

Samsung SM843T SSD Review

The Samsung SM843T is an enterprise-grade SSD that is designed to offer a consistent level of performance (99.9% reliable latency and QoS) over its lifespan, and is ideal for core enterprise use cases including Big Data systems, VDI and other high-performance enterprise platforms. The SM843T is a companion to the Samsung SM843 drive, which was originally reviewed approximately a year ago. Though both Samsung SSDs use the same MDX S4LN021X01-8030 Controller, the new SM843T is architected specifically for mixed data center use cases, while the SM843 is designed to be used in environments that require read-intensive behavior like server boot drives, higher-end enterprise client workstations and certain embedded applications. The other main difference between the two is that the SM843T uses enterprise NAND (eMLC), which focuses on prolonging the reliability of the drive, while the SM843 uses client MLC NAND.

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by Adam Armstrong

Echostreams DuraStreams DSS320 With LSI Syncro CS Review

The Echostreams DSS320 is a redundant storage server platform, part of the DuraStreams family. The DSS320 is designed specifically for SMB verticals, integrating the LSI Syncro CS solution for HA storage access. The DSS320 supports two hot-swap compute nodes with different motherboard options to support either uniprocessor (UP) or dual processor (DP) configurations. Unlike traditional approaches to high-availability, there is no need to cluster multiple separate servers together as both nodes are housed in the same chassis in a single CiB solution.

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by Adam Armstrong

Echostreams DuraStreams DSS320 With LSI Syncro CS Review

The Echostreams DSS320 is a redundant storage server platform, part of the DuraStreams family. The DSS320 is designed specifically for SMB verticals, integrating the LSI Syncro CS solution for HA storage access. The DSS320 supports two hot-swap compute nodes with different motherboard options to support either uniprocessor (UP) or dual processor (DP) configurations. Unlike traditional approaches to high-availability, there is no need to cluster multiple separate servers together as both nodes are housed in the same chassis in a single CiB solution.

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by Josh Linden

Memblaze PBlaze3H and PBlaze3L Application Accelerator Review

Memblaze offers a dizzying array of configurations for PBlaze3 across 38 different capacities as part Memblaze's Pianokey technology. In addition to the MLC-based drives evaluated for this review, both drives are also available in SLC editions. Pianokey and other core components of the PBlaze3 platform are built with Memblaze's own proprietary technologies which is one reason to keep an eye on their emerging new product lines. One of the advantages that Memblaze argues for its products over comparable drives is that the card provides most of the computational and DRAM requirements for its operation, reducing PBlaze3's operational overhead to the host system.

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by Josh Linden

Memblaze PBlaze3H and PBlaze3L Application Accelerator Review

Memblaze offers a dizzying array of configurations for PBlaze3 across 38 different capacities as part Memblaze's Pianokey technology. In addition to the MLC-based drives evaluated for this review, both drives are also available in SLC editions. Pianokey and other core components of the PBlaze3 platform are built with Memblaze's own proprietary technologies which is one reason to keep an eye on their emerging new product lines. One of the advantages that Memblaze argues for its products over comparable drives is that the card provides most of the computational and DRAM requirements for its operation, reducing PBlaze3's operational overhead to the host system.

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