Consumer SSD Reviews
StorageReview.com SSD reviews cover both consumer and enterprise SSD reviews. Flash storage comes in a variety of interfaces which is how the SSD communicates with the computer. Our SSD reviews category covers NVMe SSDs and SATA SSDs for end users. NVMe SSDs are typically much faster, but more expensive, than SATA SSDs. NVMe SSD adoption is accelerating though as the SATA lifecycle is nearing the end; most new laptops and desktops will have NVMe flash storage inside. NVMe SSDs aren't always going to be high-performance though, NVMe SSD speed depends on a variety of factors. StorageReview SSD reviews clearly focus on SSD speed, but there's much more to consider like flash technology used, SSD controller, drive capacity, and price, to best understand where each SSD is best.

NVMe may be the most popular interface for consumer SSDs, but SSDs come in a number of shapes and sizes as well. Most common still is the standard 2.5" form factor that SSDs have used for years. M.2 NVMe SSDs are gaining popularity in space constrained use cases, like notebooks and portable workstations. PCs often use M.2 NVMe SSDs too, because many more of them can be put into a system often via PCIe card that can house four or even eight drives. 2.5" NVMe SSDs still have a capacity advantage though, as there's more room to put flash storage modules on the PCB. Lastly some vendors prefer the NVMe add-in card (PCIe card) because it offers the most room for flash inside a PC.

For help deciding on an SSD for your system or to get support, please post to our SSD Forums.

by Lyle Smith

Samsung 860 EVO SSD Review (1TB)

The Samsung 860 EVO 1TB is the mid-range capacity model of the company’s newest consumer SSD line, which was announced concurrently at CES 2018 with the Samsung 860 PRO. Like the previous generations of this immensely popular line, Samsung’s new 860 EVO SSDs are designed for general desktop use cases and those who won’t be going too far in queue depths.

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by Adam Armstrong

Samsung 860 EVO SSD Review

Along with the Samsung 860 PRO that was announced at CES 2018 for high-end users, the company has also released a new 860 EVO. The EVO line is aimed for more mainstream uses for notebooks and desktops. Making improvements on the 850 EVO, the 860 EVO has six times the sustained performance of the 850 and has quoted speeds of 550MB/s read and 520MB/s write, which is only a hair over the quoted speeds of the 850 EVO on read and the same on write.

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by Adam Armstrong

Intel SSD 760p Review

Intel is expanding its 3D NAND SSDs and its NVMe footprint with today’s release of the Intel SSD 760p Series. This M.2 SSD leverages an NVMe interface and the benefits that one would expect from it: mainly a performance increase and lower power consumption. The M.2 form factor also makes it ideal for mobile platforms such as ultra-thin notebooks.

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by Lyle Smith

Samsung 860 PRO SSD Review

The Samsung 860 PRO is the company’s latest and greatest consumer SSD that’s ready to make an impact on the market. The Samsung SSDs have been the most popular and easily the best price/performance drives over the past several years, with the last model (Samsung 850 PRO) setting a new bar in performance and capacity in a consumer drive. Featuring the latest 512Gb and 256Gb 64-layer V-NAND, 8Gb LPDDR4 mobile DRAM and a new MJX controller, the Samsung 860 PRO is specced to deliver the same results. Samsung states that their new MJX controller allows for faster communication with the host system, has improved Linux compatibility, and can effectively handle workstation storage.

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by Adam Armstrong

Plextor M9Pe(G) NVMe SSD Review (512GB)

Introduced at CES 2018, the new Plextor M9Pe Series of SSDs are aimed at end users looking for more performance in their drives. While the Series has three models aimed at three slightly different use cases, for this review we will be focused on the M9Pe(G). The M9Pe(G) is a M.2 NVMe SSD that is ideal for gamers and prosumers that need high performance in a smaller form factor.

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by Adam Armstrong

Crucial MX500 SSD Review (500GB)

A couple of weeks ago we received and review the 1TB version of Crucial’s new MX500 SSD. As we stated then, this new 2.5” drive is being marketed as a drop in replacement for HDDs or a low cost flash option for OEMs. The drive was released in 250GB, 500GB, 1TB, and 2TB capacities and both 2.5” an M.2 form factors (though the M.2 tops out at 1TB).

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by Adam Armstrong

Crucial MX500 SSD Review

Crucial has expanded its MX line of SSDs with the addition of the MX500 SATA SSD. The drive comes in two form factors: either 2.5” or M.2. It also comes in several capacities ranging from 250GB up to 2TB, though the 2TB version is for the 2.5” form factor only. The drive is being billed as a drop in replacement for HDDs or a low cost flash alternative for system builders and OEMs. 

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by Lyle Smith

Toshiba TR200 SSD Review

The Toshiba TR200 is a budget-friendly drive that features both low power consumption during operation and cost savings. The TR200 Series is the company’s first consumer SSD equipped with 64-Layer 3-bit-per-cell TLC BiCS FLASH, technology that previously only shipped with OEM products. Though Toshiba has indicated that their retail SSDs will now be branded under their name (while OCZ will act as a sub-series), they will have the same performance of OCZ drives and will still target the same markets.

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by Lyle Smith

Crucial BX300 SSD Review

The Crucial BX300 is the company’s latest consumer SSD that combines their 3D NAND with a budget-friendly price tag. The new BX300 SSD is the direct successor to the BX200 and features a Silicon Motion Controller and custom firmware. Highly energy efficient, the BX300 is available in 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB capacities.

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by Lyle Smith

SanDisk Ultra 3D SSD Review

The SanDisk Ultra 3D is a new client SSD similar to that of the WD Blue 3D. Because this drive is on the lower end of the performance scale, its main application will be general upgrades from an HDD-based system to solid-state technology for faster boot up times and speedier overall performance. It should also be noted that WD has the same drive under its own brand, so this is essentially an identical SSD with a different sticker slapped on it.

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