StorageReview.com SSD reviews cover both consumer and enterprise SSD reviews. Flash storage comes in a variety of interfaces which is how the SSD communicates with the computer. Our SSD reviews category covers NVMe SSDs and SATA SSDs for end users. NVMe SSDs are typically much faster, but more expensive, than SATA SSDs. NVMe SSD adoption is accelerating though as the SATA lifecycle is nearing the end; most new laptops and desktops will have NVMe flash storage inside. NVMe SSDs aren't always going to be high-performance though, NVMe SSD speed depends on a variety of factors. StorageReview SSD reviews clearly focus on SSD speed, but there's much more to consider like flash technology used, SSD controller, drive capacity, and price, to best understand where each SSD is best.

NVMe may be the most popular interface for consumer SSDs, but SSDs come in a number of shapes and sizes as well. Most common still is the standard 2.5" form factor that SSDs have used for years. M.2 NVMe SSDs are gaining popularity in space constrained use cases, like notebooks and portable workstations. PCs often use M.2 NVMe SSDs too, because many more of them can be put into a system often via PCIe card that can house four or even eight drives. 2.5" NVMe SSDs still have a capacity advantage though, as there's more room to put flash storage modules on the PCB. Lastly some vendors prefer the NVMe add-in card (PCIe card) because it offers the most room for flash inside a PC.

For help deciding on an SSD for your system or to get support, please post to our SSD Forums.

by Lyle Smith

Samsung Begins Mass Producing 250GB SATA SSDs with 6th-gen 256Gb 3bit V-NAND

Samsung has started the mass production of 250GB SATA SSDs that integrate the company’s 6th-gen (1xx-layer) 256Gb 3bit V-NAND for global PC OEMs. With its ‘channel hole etching’ technology, Samsung indicates that the new V-NAND adds approximately 40% more cells to the previous 9x-layer single-stack structure. This is done by building an electrically conductive mold stack with 136 layers, then vertically piercing cylindrical holes from top to bottom, which creates a uniform 3D charge trap flash (CTF) cells.

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by Lyle Smith

What is M.2?

The M.2 solid-state drive (SSD) was designed specifically to offer high-performance in compact computing devices like ultrabooks and tablets; however, they are now commonly used in all types of computers including desktops PCs and even within servers and storage arrays as boot drives. M.2 SSDs are also used in NAS devices as a cache or tiering drive.

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by Lyle Smith

What is an SSD (solid-state drive)?

SSD is short for solid-state drive and is similar to technology like USB memory sticks as they have no moving parts. This is what really sets it apart from the hard disk drives (HDDs), which use a mechanical arm with a read/write head to move around and read information from the right location on a storage platter. This difference is what makes SSD so much faster.

SSDs come in several form factors:

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by Adam Armstrong

Toshiba BG4 NVMe SSD Review

Back at CES this year, Toshiba announced its new BG4 lineup. BG4 stands for the fourth generation of the company’s ball grid array (BGA) SSD product line. These new SSDs come in the tiny M.2 2230 form factor making them ideal for ultra-mobile PCs, 2-in-1 notebook PCs, IoT/embedded devices, and server and storage array boot drives. Though the drives are small in size they do come in capacities ranging from 128GB to 1TB. 

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by Adam Armstrong

ADATA XPG SX6000 M.2 PCIe SSD Review

The ADATA XPG SX6000 is the latest in the company's line of M.2 PCIe SSDs. The drive is touted as being a better performer at the same costs, or offering a better cost-performance ratio. The drive comes in a M.2 (2280) form factor and leverages PCIe3x2 interface (NVMe 1.2 supported). The drive utilizes 3D NAND that gives it quoted speeds of 1GB/s read and 800MB/s write.

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by Adam Armstrong

Samsung 970 EVO Plus 2TB Review

Released earlier this year, the Samsung 970 EVO Plus line is the latest NVMe SSD portfolio from the company. The 970 EVO Plus line comes in M.2 2280 form factor and is aimed at IT professionals, pro gamers, creative professionals, and general tech enthusiasts. Not part of the initial release, Samsung has now rolled out a 2TB capacity of the drive. The new version doubles the initial 1TB capacity and brings a few performance bumps with reported speeds of 3.5GB/s read 3.3GB/s write sequentially, and random (QD32) of 620K IOPS read and 560K IOPS write, with random (QD1) of 19K IOPS read and 62K IOPS write. 

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by Lyle Smith

Seagate BarraCuda 510 NVMe SSD Review

The Seagate BarraCuda 510 is a consumer drive for users looking to leverage the NVMe interface inside their ultra-thin laptops, workstations, and desktop PCs, though it’s also available in a 2.5 SATA model. First revealed during CES 2019 in January, the BarraCuda 510 features 3D cTLC NAND and capacities up to 512GB. The new Seagate drive also comes bundled with SeaTools SSD, which is the company’s free software that tests and analyzes their drives for health monitoring.

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by Adam Armstrong

Kingston KC2000 NVMe SSD Review

The Kingston KC2000 SSD is the company’s next generation M.2 NVMe drive that is geared toward power users. The drive leverages 96-layer, 3D TLC NAND and the latest Gen 3.0 x 4 controller to deliver quoted speeds of 3.2GB/s read and 2.2GB/s write. With the drive’s performance and endurance, Kingston states it would be a good fit for desktops, workstation, and high-performance computing systems. 

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by Lyle Smith

Toshiba Announces XG6-P SSD Series

Toshiba has announced the XG6-P SSD series, an offshoot of its performance-driven NVMe M.2 XG6 Series. The new Toshiba line are designed for high-end workstation PCs and gaming systems and cost-optimized data center and composable infrastructures. Available is capacities up to 2TB, Toshiba claims a significant improvement over other Toshiba drives, including double the capacity of the XG6, faster write speeds than the XG5-P, and a lower power envelope and smaller form factor than the datacenter class XD5.

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by Adam Armstrong

Intel Optane Memory H10 Review

Announced at CES this year, Intel Optane Memory H10 is the marriage of two technologies that brings Optane performance in a higher capacity SSD, without the higher associated costs. Intel Optane flash and Intel QLC 3D NAND are combined on a single M.2 2280 form factor in a hybrid storage configuration. Optane brings the performance for end user workloads, while QLC brings affordable capacity. 

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