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AMD Adds More EPYC CPUs

by Adam Armstrong

Today AMD rolled out two new second generation EPYC processors to add more performance options so customers can meet the right performance to workload. AMD is adding yet another 64 core CPU in the 7662 as well as a new 32 core model as well with the 7532. The new CPUs will come with all of the rest of the features that the second generation of EPYC processors are known for such as support for PCIe 4.0, 3200MHz RAM, and security features.


Today AMD rolled out two new second generation EPYC processors to add more performance options so customers can meet the right performance to workload. AMD is adding yet another 64 core CPU in the 7662 as well as a new 32 core model as well with the 7532. The new CPUs will come with all of the rest of the features that the second generation of EPYC processors are known for such as support for PCIe 4.0, 3200MHz RAM, and security features.

The launch of the AMD EPYC Rome 7002 server CPUs came with quite a bit of excitement last year. The CPUs marked the first instance where x86 servers could have up to 64 cores and support PCIe 4.0 (assuming you have the server that supports it, it is not a drop in and replace type of thing). The second generation of EPYC CPUs also brought more performance, including more performance out of one CPU versus competitors’ two CPUs. All of this is said to be at a lower price point as well.

Today, the company is releasing yet another 64-core processor, their fifth overall, with the AMD EPYC 7662. This new processor has the same number of Zen 2 cores as the highest performer, the AMD EPYC 7H12, but is said to come in at a much lower cost point. This could be in relation to VMware changing its per-socket license to per 32 cores license. Users of 64-core CPUs would have to pay twice the price as 32-cores. By releasing another 64-Core CPU at a lower price, AMD is still making economic sense to those that need the performance but are wary of the costs.

Speaking of 32 cores, AMD is also releasing a new 32-core CPU, the AMD EPYC 7532, that comes with 256MB of L3 cache, the same as their 64-core processors. This gives each core up to 8MB of L3 cache making it ideal for cache sensitive workloads, like ANSYS CFX, with AMD claiming that the 7532 has 111% better performance compared to the Intel Xeon 6248. Again, this feel like a response to the VMware license change: making a faster 32-Core CPU that won’t cost users multiple licenses.

ModelDefault TDPCoresThreadsBase FrequencyMax. Boost FrequencyL3 Cache
7662225W641282.0GhzUp to 3.3Ghz256MB
7532200W32642.4GhzUp to 3.3Ghz256MB

The first partners to support these two new CPUs are Dell Technologies and Supermicro. Both the 7662 and 7532 are supported on the Dell EMC PowerEdge R6515, R7515, R6525, R7525 and C6525 servers as well as on all Supermicro A+ servers, while the Supermicro “Big Twin” server supports the AMD EPYC 7532. If these aren’t the vendors you need, no worries as HPE and Lenovo are expected to support the new CPUs soon.

Searching around it looks like the 7662 can be picked up for around $6,700 and the 7532 can be picked up for around $3,600 at Bottom Line Telecommunications. Of course, bulk pricing could change these numbers.

AMD EPYC

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