Home ConsumerClient Accessories XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 Review

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 Review

by Charles P. Jefferies

We continue our DDR5 memory reviews with XPG Lancer RGB DDR5, a high-performance kit from ADATA. It runs slightly faster than the DDR5-4800 standard, at DDR5-5200, and advertises tighter timings than most kits we’ve seen. Its RGB lighting effects aren’t to be missed, either.

We continue our DDR5 memory reviews with XPG Lancer RGB DDR5, a high-performance kit from ADATA. It runs slightly faster than the DDR5-4800 standard, at DDR5-5200, and advertises tighter timings than most kits we’ve seen. Its RGB lighting effects aren’t to be missed, either.

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5 lit up

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 Specifications

DDR5 is the new memory standard for mainstream PCs as of late 2021, offering higher memory bandwidth and potentially lower power consumption than DDR4. It’s not going to replace DDR4 right away and is currently used in only high-end platforms due to its comparatively high cost.

The 32GB kit (2x 16GB) of XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 memory under review here retails for $299 on Amazon, slightly more than the Kingston Fury Beast DDR5-5200 memory we already reviewed (which is currently $273). If that sounds like a lot of money for 32GB of memory, it is; 32GB of DDR4-3200 can be had for $100 to $120. It will be several years before DDR5 achieves price parity with DDR4. It’s the price you’ll pay for being an early adopter.

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 is high-performance memory since it runs at a higher frequency than the DDR5-4800 standard. Its price reflects that; a 32GB DDR5-4800 kit from XPG’s parent company, ADATA, goes for about $260 on Amazon.

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5 front

The XPG kit backs up its performance aspirations with attractive aluminum heat spreaders. We’re testing the black version, but they also come in white. Its built-in RGB lights are an easy way to show this memory in a windowed case. The lights can be controlled using the apps that come with most motherboards.

Installing XPG Lancer RGB DDR5 is just as easy as DDR4. Both DDR4 and DDR5 use 288-pin DIMMs, though a different notch position makes it impossible to install DDR5 memory in a DDR4 slot and vice versa.

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5 back

The full specifications of the XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 memory are as follows. (Also see this memory on XPG’s website.)

Memory Type/Form Factor DDR5 U-DIMM
Colors Black/White
Capacity 16GB
Speeds 5200, 6000MT/s
CAS Latencies 38, 48
Operating Voltage 1.25V, 1.35V
Operating Temperature 0 to 85 degrees C
Dimensions 133.35 by 40 by 8 mm
Weight 74g
Warranty Lifetime limited warranty

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 Performance

We use our self-built StorageReview desktop to test DDR5 memory. It has the following specifications:

The XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 kit reviewed here is two 16GB modules (32GB) total. We benchmarked it at its rated DDR5-5200 speed both with and without its XMP II profile engaged. Its timings are as follows:

  • DDR5-5200 CL40-40-40-61 (no XMP)
  • DDR5-5200 CL38-38-38-60 (XMP II)

As expected, engaging the XMP II profile tightens up the timings versus our motherboard’s default settings. The other kits we are using for comparison include:

Comparisons will be somewhat inexact because the kits aren’t all the same capacity or speed. That said, it will still be possible to infer whether the XPG kit’s high frequency and relatively low latency separate it from the others.

SiSoftware Sandra 2021

We start with the popular SiSoftware Sandra 2021 suite. Higher numbers are better in all subtests. The DDR5-5200 tests are first, both with and without XMP II profiles engaged. We are leaving the Corsair kit out of this since it can’t run at DDR5-5200.

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 Team Group T-Force Delta RGB DDR5-5200 Kingston Fury Beast DDR5-5200
No XMP XMP II No XMP XMP II No XMP XMP II
Memory Bandwidth 62.560GB/s 62.945GB/s 62.352GB/s 62.243GB/s 62.758GB/s 61.811GB/s
Cache & Memory Latency 32.9ns 34.0ns 32.9ns 33.4ns 32.9ns 33.4ns
Cache & Memory Bandwidth 485.656GB/s 487.290GB/s 487.508GB/s 487.176GB/s 493.096GB/s 484.779GB/s
Overall Memory Score 2.46kPT 2.44kPT 2.44kPT 2.46kPT 2.48kPT 2.44kPT

The XPG’s memory bandwidth numbers are slightly better, especially with XMP II engaged; its best showing was 62.945GB/s. Overall, though, calling the XPG kit definitively faster than the others would be too much of a stretch.

Now we’ll see how the XPG DDR5-5200 kit compares to the Kingston kit downclocked to DDR5-4800 and the Corsair Vengeance kit at DDR5-4000 (our motherboard’s default setting) and DDR5-4400 (XMP II).

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 Kingston Fury Beast DDR5-4800 Corsair Vengeance DDR5
No XMP XMP II No XMP XMP II No XMP (DDR5-4000) XMP II (DDR5-4400)
Memory Bandwidth 62.560GB/s 62.945GB/s 54.418GB/s 58.801GB/s 52.654GB/s 54.403GB/s
Cache & Memory Latency 32.9ns 34.0ns 34.6ns 34.5ns 35.9ns 35.3ns
Cache & Memory Bandwidth 485.656GB/s 487.290GB/s 479.352GB/s 479.322GB/s 465.443GB/s 471.794GB/s
Overall Memory Score 2.46kPT 2.44kPT 2.35kPT 2.36kPT 2.23kPT 2.27kPT

Immediately, we see the XPG kit offers significantly higher memory bandwidth thanks to its higher frequency; with XMP II, it achieved 62.945GB/s versus the 58.801GB/s for the Kingston kit and 54.403GB/s for the Corsair kit (which was running at DDR5-4400). The higher frequency also allowed the XPG kit to enjoy the lowest latency.

7-Zip Compression Benchmark

The excellent 7-Zip file archive tool has a handy built-in compression benchmark. We ran 10 passes using a 128MB dictionary size and all 24 CPU threads of our Core i9-12900K; higher numbers are better.

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 Team Group T-Force Delta RGB DDR5-5200 Kingston Fury Beast DDR5-5200
No XMP XMP II No XMP XMP II No XMP XMP II
Compressing
Current CPU Usage 2020% 2012% 2021% 2040% 2022% 2014%
Current Rating/Usage 4.914 GIPS 4.952 GIPS 4.878 GIPS 4.810 GIPS 4.846 GIPS 4.898 GIPS
Current Rating 99.263 GIPS 99.645 GIPS 98.558 GIPS 98.109 GIPS 97.977 GIPS 98.664 GIPS
Resulting CPU Usage 2021% 2022% 2025% 2023% 2024% 2017%
Resulting Rating/Usage 4.875 GIPS 4.908 GIPS 4.858 GIPS 4.850 GIPS 4.847 GIPS 4.855 GIPS
Resulting Rating 98.499 GIPS 99.257 GIPS 98.369 GIPS 98.142 GIPS 98.098 GIPS 97.934 GIPS
Decompressing
Current CPU Usage 2300% 2298% 2314% 2325% 2264% 2306%
Current Rating/Usage 5.856 GIPS 5.822 GIPS 5.839 GIPS 5.703 GIPS 5.764 GIPS 5.661 GIPS
Current Rating 134.663 GIPS 133.801 GIPS 135.102 GIPS 132.588 GIPS 130.510 GIPS 130.539 GIPS
Resulting CPU Usage 2300% 2292% 2304% 2300% 2276% 2298%
Resulting Rating/Usage 5.811 GIPS 5.774 GIPS 5.806 GIPS 5.776 GIPS 5.781 GIPS 5.737 GIPS
Resulting Rating 133.669 GIPS 132.347 GIPS 133.791 GIPS 132.838 GIPS 131.604 GIPS 131.818 GIPS
Total Ratings
Total CPU Usage 2160% 2157% 2165% 2162% 2150% 2157%
Total Rating/Usage 5.343 GIPS 5.341 GIPS 5.332 GIPS 5.313 GIPS 5.314 GIPS 5.296 GIPS
Total Rating 116.084 GIPS 115.082 GIPS 116.080 GIPS 115.490 GIPS 114.851 GIPS 114.876 GIPS

As we’ve come to expect in this benchmark, the total ratings tend to smooth out the differences between kits. The compression sub-scores show the significant differences, where the XPG kit shined. In XMP II, its resulting rating was 99.257 GIPS compared to the Team Group’s 98.142 GIPS and the Kingston’s 97.934 GIPS.

Now for how the XPG DDR5-5200 kit performs against the Kingston kit downclocked to DDR5-4800 and the Corsair Vengeance.

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5-5200 Kingston Fury Beast DDR5-4800 Corsair Vengeance DDR5
No XMP XMP II No XMP XMP II No XMP (DDR5-4000) XMP II (DDR5-4400)
Compressing
Current CPU Usage 2020% 2012% 2035% 2016% 2001% 1996%
Current Rating/Usage 4.914 GIPS 4.952 GIPS 4.565 GIPS 4.595 GIPS 4.478 GIPS 4.583 GIPS
Current Rating 99.263 GIPS 99.645 GIPS 92.913 GIPS 92.664 GIPS 89.612 GIPS 91.460 GIPS
Resulting CPU Usage 2021% 2022% 2032% 2017% 1999% 2004%
Resulting Rating/Usage 4.875 GIPS 4.908 GIPS 4.601 GIPS 4.656 GIPS 4.401 GIPS 4.537 GIPS
Resulting Rating 98.499 GIPS 99.257 GIPS 93.468 GIPS 93.905 GIPS 87.978 GIPS 90.932 GIPS
Decompressing
Current CPU Usage 2300% 2298% 2278% 2319% 2307% 2296%
Current Rating/Usage 5.856 GIPS 5.822 GIPS 5.766 GIPS 5.700 GIPS 5.681 GIPS 5.702 GIPS
Current Rating 134.663 GIPS 133.801 GIPS 131.324 GIPS 132.166 GIPS 131.065 GIPS 130.922 GIPS
Resulting CPU Usage 2300% 2292% 2247% 2312% 2284% 2291%
Resulting Rating/Usage 5.811 GIPS 5.774 GIPS 5.744 GIPS 5.721 GIPS 5.701 GIPS 5.722 GIPS
Resulting Rating 133.669 GIPS 132.347 GIPS 129.050 GIPS 132.262 GIPS 130.237 GIPS 131.083 GIPS
Total Ratings
Total CPU Usage 2160% 2157% 2139% 2164% 2142% 2147%
Total Rating/Usage 5.343 GIPS 5.341 GIPS 5.172 GIPS 5.188 GIPS 5.051 GIPS 5.130 GIPS
Total Rating 116.084 GIPS 115.082 GIPS 111.259 GIPS 113.083 GIPS 109.108 GIPS 111.008 GIPS

Focusing on the compression scores, the XPG kit expectedly scored better across the board, thanks to its higher frequency. With XMP II engaged, its resulting rating of 99.257 GIPS far outpaced the Kingston’s 93.905 GIPS and the Corsair’s 90.932 GIPS.

Conclusion

XPG Lancer RGB DDR5 is the fastest DDR5-5200 kit we’ve tested to date. Its aggressive timings helped it achieve best-in-class benchmark scores next to kits from Kingston and Team Group. The differences weren’t massive and likely won’t be noticeable day to day, so we wouldn’t recommend spending significantly more for this kit for that reason, but it’s the sensible pick if the prices are close.

We also demonstrated that the XPG kit at DDR5-5200 has noticeable bandwidth and latency advantages over DDR5-4800, DDR5-4400, and DDR5-4000. Those investing in Intel Core i9 or AMD Ryzen 9 systems will be able to squeeze more performance out of them with faster memory.

We also like the XPG Lancer RGB DDR5’s aluminum heat spreaders, which aren’t always included on DDR5 modules, and its RGB lighting and lifetime warranty. Overall, the kit comes highly recommended.

XPG Kit on Amazon

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