Enterprise SSD Reviews
by Lyle Smith

Kingston DC500M Enterprise SSD Review

Released in March of this year, the Kingston Data Center DC500M is a SATA enterprise SSD that leverages the latest 3D TLC NAND. Kingston's new SSD implements the company’s strict QoS requirements to ensure predictable random I/O performance as well as predictable low latencies over a wide range of read and write workloads. Where the DC500R (R stands for read intensive) tended fall behind as write activity increased, the DC500M is built to excel in these types of workloads.

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by Brian Beeler

Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory NoSQL Performance Review

Earlier this year we posted Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory data in our review of the Supermicro SuperServer 1029U-TN10RT platform. Supermicro was one of the first out of the gate with Intel persistent memory support and the dual-processor 2U system has done great work as a persistent memory test bed. Looking at Optane DC persistent memory speed in the traditional block storage way is instructive, but the real value of persistent memory is revealed by applications that can natively take advantage of this new medium, intelligently placing data in DRAM, persistent memory or onboard storage as the application needs. To better understand the performance profile of Optane DC persistent memory, we put the Supermicro server to work using a leading NoSQL platform, Aerospike.

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by StorageReview Enterprise Lab

Seagate IronWolf 110 SSD 3.84TB Review

The Seagate IronWolf SSD family was launched a few months ago near the end of April with the promise of improved reads and writes (and thus a longer life span) via the company’s Durawrite technology. We previously looked at the new IronWolf drive in a NAS environment with 8 samples of the 240GB SSDs in RAID 6. For this review, we are looking at a single 3.84TB capacity IronWolf 110 SSD within a server. As we mentioned in the previous review, the benefits of using SSDs in a NAS environment are significant if the cost, durability and capacity all match customer needs. 

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by Marshall Gunnell

Seagate IronWolf 110 SSD NAS Review

The Seagate IronWolf 110 SSD, though announced at CES back in January, only recently hit the market at the end of April. The IronWolf 110 SSD is an edition to Seagate’s enterprise-class drives, promising accelerated reads and writes through Seagate’s exclusive Durawrite technology, which also is said to extend the life of the flash. But let's not go too far into this without acknowledging the fact that Seagate has launched an SSD specific to the NAS use case, an industry first. If nothing else this gives more creedence, as if there wasn't enoungh prior, that the performance profile of flash is wanted in just about every use case possible, so long as cost, durability and capacity meet customer's needs. The last one is an interesting point. While HDDs have hit the 14TB water mark, SSDs are far too costly to go into NAS workloads at that capacity. What flash unlocks however, is the ability to enable deduplication, compression and erasure coding to net effective capacities of 4:1 or more, depending on workload. So the top capacity Ironwolf 110 SSD, could really come out at nearly 12TB effective in the right environment.

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by StorageReview Enterprise Lab

Kingston DC500R Enterprise SSD Review

The Kingston DC500R, announced in mid-March of this year, is an enterprise-grade SSD, ideal for read-intensive applications such as server boot, web serving, virtual desktop infrastructure, operational databases, and analytics. This 2.5” form factor SSD is optimized for read-intensive applications and is the first to implement Kingston’s strict QoS requirements to ensure predictable random I/O performance and low latencies over a wide range of read and write workloads.

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by Adam Armstrong

Samsung 883 DCT SATA SSD Review

As Samsung updates its Data Center line of drives it is easy to get enamored by the fastest or largest drives that come along, namely NVMe drives. There is, however, still a large market for SATA interface drives. For this segment Samsung has released its new Samsung 883 DCT SATA SSD. The new drive is aimed at meeting the demands of server storage systems while giving the assurance of end-to-end data protection.

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by Adam Armstrong

Samsung 983 DCT NVMe SSD Review

The Samsung 983 DCT is the company’s latest Data Center SSD. The 983 DCT leverages NVMe interface and comes in two form factors: 2.5” and M.2. The drive is built off of proven Samsung components and its battle proven V-NAND. The drive is specifically geared toward performance but also come end-to-end data protection, more efficient management through the Samsung SSD Toolkit software, and a 5-year warranty.

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by Adam Armstrong

Memblaze PBlaze5 916 AIC Review

Memblaze has released a series of 64-Layer, 3D NAND NVMe SSDs in the PBlaze5 910-916 series. The drives were released in both U.2 and AIC form factors with the 910 going all the way up to 15.36TB in capacity. The higher endurance version of the drive is the 916. We’ve previously reviewed the 916 U.2 SSD and are now focusing on the higher performing HHHL AIC version. 

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by Lyle Smith

Memblaze PBlaze5 916 Series U.2 SSD Review

The PBlaze5 916 series is a 64-layer 3D NAND high-performance line of NVMe SSDs that focus on energy efficiency for data centers. It has the usual suspects for enterprise features, including AES 256 Data Encryption, Full Data Path Protection, and Enhanced Power Failure protection, helping safeguard critical enterprise applications. The 916 series comes in both 2.5-inch U.2 and HHHL AIC form factors, the former which we are looking at for this review.

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by Marshall Gunnell

Samsung 983 ZET Review

Samsung has moved into the market that aims to fill the gap between system memory and storage with its new 983 ZET SSD. So far in this arena we’ve seen, not necessarily the most performant drives, but drives with very low latency. The 983 ZET is an NVMe SSD designed specifically for low latency (with claims Quality of Service (QoS) read/writes of up to 0.03ms at a minimal 20μs latency) for high-performance computing applications as well as emerging technologies that are becoming more common such as AI and IoT. 

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