Consumer SSD Reviews
SSD reviews span both consumer and enterprise SSD reviews forming an umbrella over SATA, SAS, mSATA and M.2 SSDs. Consumer SSD reviews focus on SSDs engineered for use in client computers. We also offer a section for client PCIe storage reviews which covers high throughput flash and caching solutions. For help deciding on an SSD for your system or to get support, please post to our SSD Forums.
by Lyle Smith

SanDisk Ultra 3D SSD Review

The SanDisk Ultra 3D is a new client SSD similar to that of the WD Blue 3D. Because this drive is on the lower end of the performance scale, its main application will be general upgrades from an HDD-based system to solid-state technology for faster boot up times and speedier overall performance. It should also be noted that WD has the same drive under its own brand, so this is essentially an identical SSD with a different sticker slapped on it.

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by Lyle Smith

SanDisk Ultra 3D SSD Review

The SanDisk Ultra 3D is a new client SSD similar to that of the WD Blue 3D. Because this drive is on the lower end of the performance scale, its main application will be general upgrades from an HDD-based system to solid-state technology for faster boot up times and speedier overall performance. It should also be noted that WD has the same drive under its own brand, so this is essentially an identical SSD with a different sticker slapped on it.

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by Adam Armstrong

Intel 545S SSD Review

Intel’s latest client SSD featuring its new 64-Layer, TLC, Intel 3D NAND, is the 545S Series. The first version available, and the subject of this review, is the 2.5” form factor with 512GB capacity. Intel did state that it would be releasing more capacities, ranging form 128GB up to 2TB, and a M.2 form factor as well. The new drive is a SATA drive and will serve as an HDD replacement, offering better performance and lower power one typically sees when switching form SSD to HDD.

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by StorageReview Consumer Desk

Toshiba XG5 NVMe SSD Review

Announced last month, Toshiba’s XG5 is the company’s newest M.2 form factor (2280) NVMe SSD. The XG5 is also the first SSD from Toshiba to leverage the company’s 64-layer BiCS 3D flash memory (TLC) which delivers the highest layer count in the market. The XG5 comes in three capacities ranging from 256GB to 1TB and uses a single-sided form factor to enhance deployment flexibility in devices like ultra-thin computers or embedded/edge computing devices. The XG5 is targeted at mainstream client computing use cases where there's a clear need for performance, while still respecting a balance of power consumption and overall drive cost. For organizations with an enhanced security need, the XG5 comes in an SED flavor, supporting TCG Opal Version 2.01.

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by Tucker Mindrum

ADATA SU900 SSD Review

ADATA recently added to their 3D NAND SSD line with the SU900, a larger capacity option (2TB) that also includes performance improvements. Other than the newly added high speed SMI controller and the aforementioned changes, the SU900 is almost identical to its predecessor (the ADATA SU800 SSD). That said, the SU900 is being marketed as a good option for casual users looking to upgrade the storage of their ultrabooks, notebooks, or game consoles.

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by StorageReview Consumer Desk

Intel Optane Memory Review

Optane Memory, formally 3D XPoint, is utilizing the first new class of NAND in nearly 25 years. The Optane Memory PC-caching solution works with Intel’s new 7th generation Intel Core processors and systems that support it, to accelerate large capacity HDDs. Coming in 16GB and 32GB modules, Optane Memory is packaged in an M.2 SSD that users can add into desktop systems. When paired with its software, Intel claims up to 28% faster overall system performance, 14x hard drive access, and 2x the task responsiveness.

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by Lyle Smith

ADATA XPG SX8000 PCIe M.2 SSD Review

ADATA has entered the M.2, NVMe market with the release of the XPG SX8000. With their tiny physical footprint coupled with impactful performance, M.2 drives have become immensely popular over the past few years, offering a ton of flexibility and power. The XPG SX8000 is a mid-range M.2 SSD that supports the PCIe Gen3x4 interface and one is one of the first drives to feature the Silicon Motion SM2260 controller. The SM2260 is designed mainly for client and entry-level enterprise SSDs (in this case, however, a high-end consumer SSD) and features four 8Gbps lanes of simultaneous data flow combined with with eight NAND channels. 

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by Adam Armstrong

WD Black PCIe SSD Review

M.2 PCIe NVMe SSDs are all the rage on the consumer side of the market. These drives tend to pack a performance punch, take up a tiny amount of space (ideal for the notebook market that gets thinner and thinner each year), and more recently can bring more than enough capacity for consumer needs. WD, not wanting to be left behind, has introduced their M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD as part of their well received “Black” line of products. Like all M.2 NVMe SSDs, WD touts that their drive will deliver superior performance in a small form factor. The Black PCIe comes in both 256GB and 512GB capacities.

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by Adam Armstrong

Toshiba OCZ TL100 SSD Review

The Toshiba OCZ TL100 is an entry-level, budget-friendly SSD first announced in September. Toshiba is positioning the SSD as an HDD replacement and touting benefits one would expect from an SSD over HDD. This inculdes dramatic improvement in boot times and overall performance, with lower power consumption resulting in longer battery life. The TL100 uses Toshiba’s TLC NAND flash memory technology, and has one of the lowest suggested retail prices on the market for an SSD.

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by Adam Armstrong

Samsung 960 EVO M.2 NVMe SSD Review

Back in September, Samsung announced two new NVMe drives. The 960 PRO is targeted to pro users and enthusiasts, and the 960 EVO aims to take the advantages of NVMe and bring it to the everyday consumer. The 960 EVO comes to market with the idea of allowing consumers to benefit from the performance, low latency, small form factor, and low power consumption of NVMe—without the professional performance price tag. While the EVO doesn’t aspire to the performance of its PRO brother, it does bring a drastic improvement over a SATA interface.

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